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College Mace and Presidential Medallion

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College Mace, Presidential Medallion

The mace is a symbol of authority, derived from weapon used during the Middle Ages. MVCC’s mace was designed by Professor Willard Sauter for the inauguration of MVCC President W. Stewart Tosh in 1969.
Turned out of native hand-rubbed black walnut by Walter Pietsch, well-known local woodworking craftsman, the mace is approximately three and one-half feet high. An original arrowhead, found on the farm of Randall Bartholomew of Clinton and presented to the College by Mr. Bartholomew, is embedded in a clear globe at the top of the mace, symbolic of the area’s association with the Mohawk Indians. Three metal seals, representing the College, the State University, and Oneida County, circle the mace and two thin grooves turned in the wood symbolize the two-year college education.
A cluster of golden arrows, each approximately ten inches long, rises to the top of the mace, representing the five original institutions established by New York State after World War II, of which MVCC was the first to open. They are also reminiscent of the five original member tribes of the Iroquois nation, of which the Mohawks were one. All of the metal work and the finish of the mace was designed and crafted by Alfred Wardle of the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute.
The mace is crowned with a three-inch clear globe in which is embedded a sterling silver moebius band, symbolic of never-ending education, and the arrowhead, pointing skyward.
The mace is used in official ceremonies of the College. It is the traditional symbol of authority and power, linked with the tradition of weaponry by using the Indian weapon – the arrow. (from MVCC news release, May 30, 1971)


(10/18/69 – Observer-Dispatch) – “Tradition Begins at MVCC” –
“The Presidential medallion and faculty mace became a part of tradition yesterday at Mohawk Valley Community College. Both designed by MVCC Professor Willard Sauter… used for the first time in the inauguration of Dr. W. Stewart Tosh as president of the college.
The medallion, symbol of the authority of the Office of President, is a replica of the MVCC seal, engraved and finished in antique brass, suspected from a gold chain. A replica of an Indian arrowhead, symbolizing the area’s association with the Mohawks, is included in the design. The medallion, engraved by C. Robert Vaeth of Whitesboro, weighs about a quarter of a pound.
The arrowhead theme is repeated in the mace. An original arrowhead, found on the farm of Randall Bartholomew of Clinton and a gift to the college from Mr. Bartholomew, is imbedded at the top of the mace. Turned out of native hand-rubbed black walnut by Walter Pietsch, well known local wood-working craftsman, the mace is approximately 3 1/2 –feet high. Three metal seals, representing the college, the State University, and Oneida County, circle the mace, and two thin grooves turned in the wood symbolize the two-year college education.
A cluster of golden arrows, each approximately 10 inches long, rises to the top of the mace, representing the five original technical institutes established by New York State after World War II, of which MVCC was the first to open. All of the metal work and the finish for the mace was crafted and designed by Alfred Wardle of the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute.
The mace, symbol of faculty authority, is crowned with a three-inch clear plastic globe in which is embedded a sterling silver moebius band, symbolic of never ending education, and the arrowhead, pointing skyward.
Originally a weapon used during the Middle Ages, the mace has become a traditional symbol of authority and power, and is carried in government, religious and academic processions and ceremonies. MVCC’s mace is linked with the tradition of weaponry by using the Indian weapon – arrows.”